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Pedro Noguera

Pedro Noguera is a Distinguished Professor of Education in the Graduate School of Education and Information Sciences at UCLA. His research focuses on the ways in which schools are influenced by social and economic conditions, as well as by demographic trends in local, regional and global contexts. He is the author of eleven books and over 200 articles and monographs. He serves on the boards of numerous national and local organizations and appears as a regular commentator on educational issues on CNN, MSNBC, National Public Radio, and other national news outlets. Prior to joining the faculty at UCLA he served as a tenured professor and holder of endowed chairs at New York University, Harvard University and the University of California, Berkeley. He received a Ph.D., Sociology from the University of California, Berkeley; an M.A. in Sociology, Brown University and a B.A. in Sociology/American History and a Brown University Teaching Credential, Brown University

He has received numerous awards, including:

  • 1997 Wellness Foundation Award for Research on Youth Violence
  • 1997 University of California's Distinguished Teaching Award
  • 2001 Honorary Doctorate, University of San Francisco
  • 2001 Centennial Medal, Philadelphia University
  • 2003 Forward Magazine Gold Award (City Schools and the American Dream)
  • 2003 AESA Critics Choice Book Award (City Schools and the American Dream)
  • 2005 Whitney Young Award for Leadership in Education
  • 2006 Eugene Carrothers Award for Public Service
  • 2008 Schott Foundation Award for Research on Race and Gender
  • 2008 AESA Critics Choice Book Award (The Trouble With Black Boys)
  • 2009 Scholastic Corporation Education Hero Award
  • 2011 Honorary Doctorate, Bank Street College
  • 2012 Honorary Doctorate, Metropolitan College of New York
  • 2013 Honorary Doctorate Lewis and Clark College
  • 2013 Kappa Delta Pi Laureate
  • 2014 National Academy of Education
  • 2014 Education Justice Award, Educational Law Center, Rutgers University
  • 2014 Award for distinguished scholarship, Advanced Center for the Behavioral Sciences