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Research And Policy On Paying Teachers For Advanced Degrees

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The component here that is important is how are we measuring effectiveness. Something you discussed quite well in your recent VAM posts. If we say that advanced degrees are not worthwhile just because they don't increase test scores that is one small data point. If this incentive for increasing knowledge and skill is going to be removed, then others need to be implemented. There needs to be explicit career paths for teachers to increase their salaries that are not necessarily administrative and don't always require them to totally leave the classroom either.

Nice post Matthew. While researchers measure experience as a continuous variable (and often find stronger results), they usually measure education as a dummy -- bachelor's or masters -- decreasing the likelihood of finding a significant result. Reformers rarely note people with masters in other fields are paid a premium for their grad degrees (and those degrees are rarely questioned and subjected to "rigorous" statistical analysis). On average across the economy, those with master's degrees earn about $12k more than those with bachelor's. Certainly school districts and unions are not alone in paying additional money for additional knowledge. (http://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/articles/2012/06/29/6-reasons-why-graduate-school-pays-off) Surely there is something akin to value added in the business world so we can learn if MBA's outperform non-MBA's?

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