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Merit Pay: The End Of Innocence?

Comments

This was a good piece and needs to be promoted. "Merit pay" is another one of those "solutions" that doesn't really address the problem. One of the issues you left out of this discussion, however, is the link between "environment" and "performance." What I mean is, in the current educationsl environment, generally speaking, the teacher has very little influence on his/her performance. The biggest problem affecting teacher performance is student discipline. When teachers are spending 30/40/50% of their classroom time managing behavior, how can they be expected to "perform?" The answer to this is not just in the teacher's ability to manage the classroom. Too many of our students today lack the social skills and character development they need to participate effectively in the classroom environment. In other words, they are ready to be "managed." So, if you say to a teacher, "here, your pay depends on your performance" but don't provide them with a way to be successful, it's no wonder they aren't motivated by a chance to earn more. They won't be able to. And, as repeated studies show, burnout from student discipline and behavior is consistently within the top three reasons for why teachers leave the profession, it's obvious that "You can't pay me enough to stay." For more on this, I invite you to visit: http://socialsmarts.wordpress.com/2009/11/22/teachers-dont-have-time/ - Corinne Gregory www.corinnegregory.com www.socialsmarts.com

How does more money reduce burnout? Doesn't better administrative leadership and support do that? I think the monetary incentive works when you want someone to do something they don't want to do, like wash the dishes or take out the trash. But more money doesn't make them do it better.

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